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Get To Know Your Mini Moto - Part III

by: Matt Tong

This article explains some of the components that contribute to the make-up of the remarkable piece of engineering called the mini moto. Take a read through and discover how each component plays its part.

Air Filter

Your new mini moto is equipped with an air filter. Some bikes such as the B1 Origami rep liquid cooled and the Mini Dirt bike have a 'cone' style K and N style air filter. The 2005 mk2 mini moto and the B1 Origami Replica air cooled bikes have a standard mini moto air filter. Both air filters purify the intake of air that is sucked into the carburetor. This means that the air filter should be cleaned regularly as the mini moto's performance can begin to suffer as the engine can become starved of air if the air filter is choked with debris. To reach the air filter, remove the bikes bottom fairing, remove the protective cover by unscrewing the holding screws. Clean the air filter in petrol but make sure that the filter is dry before reattaching to you mini moto.

Tires

The tires on your mini moto are filled with air (pneumatic). Please consult your mini moto handbook for the appropriate psi. It is important to check the tire pressure regularly, an under inflated tire will affect the performance of your mini moto, acceleration can become sluggish and cornering can become dangerous.

Chain

Before riding your mini moto you need to make sure that the front and back sprockets are aligned and that the chain is perfectly straight running between them. Once you have established this make sure that the chain is tensioned correctly (please see your mini moto handbook). To test the tension of the chain you can manually push the pocket bike, if you hear a 'pinging' or 'popping' sound the chain is too loose. If the chain is noisy and starts to bind the chain is too tight. Make sure that the chain is well oiled. The chain needs to be oiled before every ride.

Gearing

The gearing of you mini moto is dictated by the number of the teeth on the front sprocket and on the back sprocket. The sprockets can be changed as an easy way to manipulate top end speed and acceleration, quite like changing gear on a mountain bike. A front sprocket with more teeth will improve acceleration; however the top end speed will be reduced. A larger rear sprocket will produce a higher top speed but acceleration will suffer. The gearing on your bike can be adjusted in accordance for the track you are intending to ride i.e. a small track with a lot of bends will suit gearing for improved acceleration, however a track with long straights will require a mini moto that is geared for a higher top speed.

About The Author

Matt Tong has been importing and riding Mini Motos for over two years. For more information please visit his mini moto site at http://www.minimotosandmore.com. Also check out the bigger versions at http://www.idealauto.co.uk!



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